Whilst the country remains deeply divided over the likely impact of Brexit, there is one clear winner that has already emerged – the Politics Department at Liverpool University, which has had to treble in size to cope with demand.

Across the country there has been a 28% surge in applications to politics courses since the debate about Europe took off in the run-up to the 2016 referendum.

Liverpool University politics lecturer Jon Tonge says that other dramatic political events, such as the Scottish independence referendum and the 2015 general election, have also boosted applications.

And the fierce, often toxic, nature of the debate on social media has also captured the attention of young people, he said.

"It is a terrible thing to say, but the more unhealthy and divisive the debate is, the better it is for politics departments in terms of bums on seats," said Prof Tonge.

It is all a far cry from the Blair years, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, dubbed the "tranquil age of politics" by Prof Tonge, when "consensus" reigned and politics courses were "not recruiting in huge numbers".